Podcast: Why Catholics Love the Bible

Ok, so sometimes we Catholics need the LARGE print edition

Ok, so sometimes we Catholics need the LARGE print edition

Many Protestants think Catholics don’t care about the Bible. Now, unfortunately many of us Catholics give them good reason to think this(!), but nonetheless the actual teaching of the Catholic Church holds the sacred Scriptures up to a lofty pedestal.

Chris Ricketts, the Warrior Catholic, interviewed me on the topic of the Bible and it will be run this evening during his radio show.  Our talk covered the Bible, Tradition, differences between Catholicism and Protestantism, Dei Verbum, Vatican II, and many other topics!

Tune in to his show tonight for my one-hour interview and then listen in to his second hour as well. You can also hear my interview below:

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18 Responses to Podcast: Why Catholics Love the Bible

  1. Augustine says:

    Many Catholics think Protestants don’t care about the Church. Now, unfortunately many Protestants give them good reason to think this!

  2. Bob says:

    I have yet to meet a RC that knows the Bible well.

    • Devin Rose says:

      They can be hard to find, but millions exist. Of course, it depends on what you mean by “knows the Bible well.”

      If you mean, “interprets the Bible to come up with the same doctrines that I do on all issues that I think are essential,” there may be none that would meet your description.

      If you mean, “knows the books of the Bible, the general course of salvation history from the Old Covenant to the New, etc. etc.) then there are lots of Catholics who do. For example, the Great Adventure Bible Timeline course has been done by lots of Catholics: http://biblestudyforcatholics.com/

      God bless,
      Devin

      • Bob says:

        Where does the RC go to find out if they have the correct interpretation of a verse or passage if the RCC has never officially interpreted all the verses of the Bible?

        • Jonathan Brumley says:

          Well, the best way to read the Bible is in the context of prayer. It is a way to listen to God. However, you can buy a Catholic study bible which has verse by verse notes. (The Ignatius Catholic Study Bible is a good one). Also, you can get study guides which show how famous Catholic saints have interpreted individual verses. (Augustine, Chrysostom, Aquinas).

          • Augustine says:

            As in listening to over 70% of the New Testament being read and commented in a daily public prayer service over three years, as in daily Mass?

            • Bob says:

              Augustine,
              How well do you think a person would retain knowledge of the NT by listening to it over the course of 3 years? What about the other 30% that is not heard?

              • De Maria says:

                Bob asks:
                How well do you think a person would retain knowledge of the NT by listening to it over the course of 3 years?

                Very well indeed.

                What about the other 30% that is not heard?

                The 30% which is not heard does not contain information essential for one’s salvation. Its stuff like this which was anulled by Christ on the Cross:
                Leviticus 14:13
                And he shall slay the lamb in the place where he shall kill the sin offering and the burnt offering, in the holy place: for as the sin offering is the priest’s, so is the trespass offering: it is most holy:

                Because:
                Ephesians 2:15
                Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;

                Therefore, the ordinances about sacrifices and washings are no longer stressed to Catholics.

                Sincerely,

                De Maria

        • Devin Rose says:

          Bob,

          In the Catholic Church, the Bible is not read looking for verses to prooftext a doctrine. As in, “we got verse 10:2 that proves Catholic doctrine X!” After all, the verse numberings themselves are a human tradition, and a rather late one at that.

          Instead, the Catholic Church teaches something, let’s say it is baptismal regeneration. Catholics should read the Bible in light of that teaching. So a Catholic reader knows when she reads passages on baptism that baptismal regeneration is true and that those passages should be interpreted in that light.

          Same with, say, justification. We are justified by faith informed by agape. So the Bible is read in harmony with that truth. Sometimes, there are specific verses that get called out, for various reasons. Maybe something like, when St. Paul one time mentions baptizing on behalf of the dead. Mormons of course do this and point out it is biblical. But it is not found in the Church’s Tradition, and so we know that we should not be baptizing on behalf of the dead.

          God bless,
          Devin

          • Bob says:

            Devin,
            Are you saying that church teaching determines the meaning of a verse-passage and not the Bible? In other words, its not what the original intent of the author of a book of the Scripture that guides what the Scripture means but rather church teachings.

            • Devin Rose says:

              Bob, no, the divine meaning is there, and God guides His Church, which is the pillar and bulwark of the truth, to understand that meaning. This involves the Apostolic Tradition as well.

              • Bob says:

                Devin,
                I have heard RC’s claim that Mary is without sin, kept from sin based on Luke 1:28. No apostle taught this in their writings. So how could this be a Apostolic Tradition?

            • De Maria says:

              Bob, you ask,

              Are you saying that church teaching determines the meaning of a verse-passage and not the Bible? Devin,
              Are you saying that church teaching determines the meaning of a verse-passage and not the Bible? In other words, its not what the original intent of the author of a book of the Scripture that guides what the Scripture means but rather church teachings.

              That’s a false dichotomy. The Bible is Church teaching. The Catholic Church inherited the Old Testament and wrote the New.

              Have you ever wondered why Jesus Christ did not write a word of Scripture? Because He wanted us to flock to His Church to get His understanding of the Word. Jesus Christ taught the Church His understanding of the Old Testament. This is the understanding which the Church now passes down to us (Luke 24:32).

            • De Maria says:

              Bob says:

              I have heard RC’s claim that Mary is without sin, kept from sin based on Luke 1:28. No apostle taught this in their writings.

              Hm? Bob, we see the teaching in Luke 1:28. Unless you are insinuating that the Apostles were not aware of that verse, you are contradicting yourself.

              In Greek, that verse describes the Virgin as “kecharitomene” which means “ever full of grace”. Therefore, she never sinned.

              So how could this be a Apostolic Tradition?

              Catholics approach the Word of God in a manner fundamentally different to the manner used by Protestants. As Catholics, we accept the Teaching of the Church concerning the Word of God (Eph 3:10). We also recognize that the Word of God is contained in Tradition and Scripture (2 Thess 2:15).

              The Tradition that the Virgin Mary is without sin is explicitly taught by our Catholic teachers (Heb 13:7). And it is implied in the Gospel of St. Luke (1:28). That doctrine is nowhere contradicted in Scripture. Therefore we accept it as truth.

              Sincerely,

              De Maria

        • De Maria says:

          Where does the RC go to find out if they have the correct interpretation of a verse or passage if the RCC has never officially interpreted all the verses of the Bible?

          Catholics approach the Word of God (that includes the Bible) in a manner fundamentally different than Protestants. We approach the Word of God in the manner which Scripture recommends. We learn the Word of God from our teachers (Heb 13:7). We learn the Word of God in Sacred Tradition and in the Sacred Writings (2Thess 2:15). When we do focus upon the Scriptures, we don’t neglect the spiritual meaning of the Word (2 Cor 3:6).

          And most importantly, as Catholics, we understand that we are fallible. We also believe that God has established an infallible Teacher of His Wisdom (Eph 3:10). Therefore, we don’t go around re-interpreting what the Church has already explained. Since it is the Church which is called the Pillar and Foundation of the Truth (1 Tim 3:15), when it comes to Scripture, we believe the Church.

          Protestants, on the other hand, discover the Word of God every time the open the Bible. That’s why they come up with so many innovations. That’s why they come up with so many errors.

    • De Maria says:

      Without meaning any disrespect, Bob. I don’t know any Protestant who understands the Bible, not even your best scholars. True, you guys repeat the words well enough. But you don’t know the true meaning of the words. And that’s the ones you know.

      For the most part, you go by the extra-biblical traditions taught you by your church. I’ll give you an example:

      Hebrews 13:17
      King James Version (KJV)
      17 Obey them that have the rule over you, and submit yourselves: for they watch for your souls, as they that must give account, that they may do it with joy, and not with grief: for that is unprofitable for you.

      Most Protestants don’t even know that verse is in Scripture. Those who have read, disregard it. Here’s the Protestant doctrine, “I won’t check my brain at the door! I’m a free thinker.”

      And here’s the kicker. Most Catholics know the Word of God better than most Protestants. You see, the Word of God does not come in the Bible alone.

      Sincerely,

      De Maria

  3. Many Catholics DO know the Bible very well. But most lay people do not.

    This is my experience as a 35 year Catholic. Most of my family are Catholics and extended family (aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews) are pretty much clueless when it comes to the Bible. And some of them are very active in the Catholic Church.

    Most Lutherans don’t know it very well, either.

    Mormons and Jehovahs Witnesses, on the other hand, know it very well. And haven’t got a clue as to what it all means.

    • De Maria says:

      Please don’t be offended, but the truth is, most Catholic lay people know the Word of God better than any Protestant.

      The Word of God comes in the Traditions of Jesus Christ and Scripture. The Traditions of Jesus Christ are essential for a proper understanding of the Word of God. They are the underpinning of the Scriptures. Jesus did not write Scripture. He established a Church and deposited in that Church the Traditions. It is based upon these Traditions that the Church wrote the New Testament.

      And Protestants who think they know the Bible are only repeating the extra-biblical traditions of men taught them by their respective churches. They rejected the true Word of God when they rejected the Traditions of Jesus Christ. Now they try to pin the Word of God on top of traditions and practices which can nowhere be found in the Bible.

      That’s the truth.

      Sincerely,

      De Maria