Southern Baptist Seminarian Turns to Rome, One Year Later

sbcsignThis is a guest post by Anthony, who one year ago made the announcement that he was leaving an SBC seminary to become Catholic.

I was scared. Wouldn’t you be? Jobless, living with my parents, gritting my teeth through physical therapy after rotator cuff surgery and . . . Catholic. Now, a year later, I can look back on my conversion and reflect on my awkward but necessary transition to the Catholic Church.

The early days were a thrill, like the adrenaline I used to get from breaking rules at school. I watched Harry Potter and drank a Corona each night for a few days, not because I liked beer but to repudiate Southern’s policy against students drinking alcohol. I stopped reading the Bible for a few weeks too—it had just become too confusing. Even though I’d memorized three books and countless verses, every epistle seemed to cry out against the supposed clarity or “perpiscuity” of scripture, and I needed a break. My parents were gracious enough to lend me their car so I could take a two-week trip to see my grandpa in Arkansas and try to stop thinking.

I visited parishes and priests throughout the trip—Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Missouri—though my most pleasant memories came from Arkansas. A janitor with an Irish accent saw me praying in a dark sanctuary and asked if she could help. An RCIA Director was called and listened intently in her office.  Soon she was handing me a YouCat, Catechism, and  rosary. (I get tears in my eyes thinking about it–I was so vulnerable and the kindness meant so much.) I read beautiful prayers and ate delicious Italian food, cooked by my Catholic grandfather.

Coming home was like stubbing my toe, a jarring call to reality. A futile job search began between pain pills and rotator cuff therapy. After Devin posted my story Elizabeth Scalia quipped, “I bet he becomes a priest,” and I wanted to respond, “You’re probably right.” Becoming Catholic for aspiring evangelical pastors is certainly confusing, because each of us has imagined his vocation including leading a church and being a husband. This tension was on display as I signed up for CatholicMatch.com in June, days after officially being received into the Catholic Church, but immediately stopped using it after being accepted into a program to serve the poor in Harlem for a year. This would be my year to explore and consider being a priest in the future.

Everything changed in July when a young woman responded to my CatholicMatch message, five weeks after I had sent it. Intrigued by the fact that we each had been chaperones at a recent Steubenville conference, we talked and set up a date. “What if you fall in love and then have to leave for Harlem?” a Catholic mentor asked. “I’ll write letters from Harlem, it will be romantic,” I promised.

On our third date, August 2, we sat on the beach and she said “yes” when I asked for permission to pursue her in a godly relationship. Her face filled with shock when I said I was going to cancel Harlem, a week before my flight left, and take my chances on a long-shot job close to home because she was simply stunning and wonderful. Four weeks later I got the job. A month after that I proposed. On June 1st Jackie will be my bride and I swear I’m the luckiest guy in the world.

When I was a freshman in college our Bible study leaders would gather us together at 7pm on Wednesdays and have us share “highs and lows” of the week. Here are my highs and lows in the Catholic Church over the last year.

High- Ecumenism. I still pray “off-the-cuff evangelical style,” read my Protestant ESV Bible, and have grown to appreciate men like Mark Driscoll and Lecrae for the clarity of their message and the courage to preach truth, especially to young men. I’ve stayed close to my evangelical friends too, and there is a mutual respect and trust between us.

Low- Cognitive dissonance. I was unprepared for the extent that basic Catholic truths would not be followed in the day-to-day life of the Catholic Church. It’s bizarre when church-going Catholics don’t consider Holy Days of Obligation obligatory, when virtually everyone in every Mass takes the Eucharist despite plain Catechism teaching against receiving when in mortal sin.

High- Pope Benedict and Pope Francis. What a blessing to live at the same time as these men. The papal conclave was a thrill and I have been pleasantly surprised by the positive reaction of so many non-Catholics to Francis.

Low- Media outreach. Discussions over whether to use social media, put homily audio/video online, or have a decent website are questions of the last decade. Pope Benedict has invited Christians to use the Internet for God’s glory, while still maintaining time for silence and reflection.

High- Mass. In a world where nothing is revered, where people tweet obscenities at the President and Pope, the Mass is a sanctuary of reverence, of focusing on Christ. The Mass is like a mustache—so counter-cultural it’s cool.

Low- Evangelism. It took me months before I could find a Catholic who sheepishly admitted we should want other people to be Catholic. The leaders have been talking about the New Evangelization for half a century, yet many look at their feet and quote something St. Francis never said.

High- The Catholic Church. For all of it’s weakness, the gates of Hell will not overcome the Church. I’m here because I love Jesus, and I believe this is where He wants me, taking in the fullness of the Christian faith.

Connect with Anthony on Facebook www.facebook.com/evangelicaltocatholic , Twitter www.twitter.com/evangtocatholic , and www.evangelicaltocatholic.com

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39 Responses to Southern Baptist Seminarian Turns to Rome, One Year Later

  1. DanC says:

    Adult converts to any religion/life philosophy are typically more by-the-book than those who grew up with it.

    Catholic converts are no different, and their criticism makes us cradle Catholics a little resentful. Cradle Catholics are so much more relaxed about things. Holy days, everyone taking communion – nobody thinks much about these things. And everyone rolls their eyes when somebody starts talking about birth control (which is one reason I think people who have been around the church very long tend to avoid that topic.)

    Folk Catholicism, cafeteria Catholicism – whatever you want to call it. It seems to me this is mainstream Catholicism as it is lived. People who came to the faith through books – who read their way to the Church – those people are often more sticklers for the rules than those of us who don’t think about it so much.

    This is what it is like for cradle Catholics – you think you’re doing fine and then a recent convert comes along to criticize you for not living the faith the way they do.

    • Anthony says:

      Thanks Dan, I appreciate your comment. Being over zealous is certainly a tendency for many. I don’t want to misunderstand you–are you saying there’s nothing problematic for Catholics to take Eucharist in mortal sin, miss Holy Days of Obligation, and use birth control?

    • Mary W says:

      Dan, my husband and I are both cradle Catholics, and I find your lack of respect for the truths of the Catholic faith offensive, especially implying that all Cradle Catholics are the same. I have been a Catholic for 50 years, and unfortunately, for many of them as a young adult, I took the Catholic faith for granted. We are blessed to be a part of The Church of Christ, and it is our responsibility to learn its teachings and follow them. “Cafeteria Catholics…mainstream Catholicism as it is lived,” is NOT the church that Jesus founded. It is NOT okay to pick and choose what you want to believe or follow. Doing so is basically saying, I know more than God and the vicar He left in charge of His people here on earth. Who is greater than God? Or as St. Michael said to Lucifer, “Who is like God!?!” just before he defeated him and threw him out of Heaven. I pray for all “Catholics” who do not know what a gift they have been given that they will open their hearts and minds to the grace of God to live and embrace that gift.

    • Another DanC says:

      Dan, speak for yourself. People like Anthony are waking us “Cradles” up to the wonderful gift God has given us in His Church — a gift that so many of us, myself included, have taken for granted.

      God bless.

    • De Maria says:

      DanC, you said:

      Folk Catholicism, cafeteria Catholicism – whatever you want to call it. It seems to me this is mainstream Catholicism as it is lived.

      No, Dan, being born into the Catholic faith does not make you an expert in the faith.

      This is what it is like for cradle Catholics –

      No, it isn’t. I know many cradle Catholics who have been faithful to the Magisterium all their lives. And many more who discovered that they were committing the same errors you are espousing but are now living according to their Catholic faith.

      You are projecting your views of Catholicism upon all cradle Catholics. But your views are wrong.

      you think you’re doing fine and then a recent convert comes along to criticize you for not living the faith the way they do.

      The impression you give is that you don’t care too much about obeying the Catholic Church. You don’t have to wait for converts to tell you that you are not living according to your faith. All you have to do is go to your Parish and talk to your priest.

      Sincerely,

      De Maria

  2. KJL says:

    Hi Anthony! Welcome home to the Church. We are grateful to have you. Also, congratulations on your upcoming marriage!

    I must disagree with DanC. There are many cradle Catholics out there who live the life of the Church as she teaches, every single day, very faithfully. This is not to say we are perfect; it is to say we love her teachings, and we try very hard to live by them day in and day out. I know so many faithful Catholics, cradles and converts. Keep searching for them, and you’ll find them. (This isn’t meant to shame “cafeteria Catholics,” but to encourage and empower them to live their faith as well as they can.) The “mainstream” Catholicism to which DanC refers is a cultural inheritance, but it is not the faith, necessarily. It’s just not true that “no one thinks about these things (Holy Days of Obligation, contraception, accepting the Eucharist while not in a state of grace).”

    As a cradle Catholic who married a convert, I am proud to embrace you and support you in your conversion journey. It’s important to remember that even cradle Catholics are always converting their hearts to Christ, just as converts are. It’s the work of a lifetime, not a single moment, as I’m sure you know.

    I wish you much joy in Him and I hope you feel the support of others around you in the Church.

    • Anthony says:

      Thank you for the encouragement KJL. It has been my experience that there are many faithful Catholics in the Church too.

  3. I get what you are saying.

    When I converted to Lutheranism as a lifelong Catholic, I was so amazed at how lightly the lifelong Lutherans treated this grace wherein (we Lutherans believe) that we don’t have to do anything, indeed we cannot do anything to become holier or better Christians, or more righteous…but that Christ’s death on the cross accomplished it ALL for us.

    I thought, and still think that is the greatest news that I have ever heard! But many, maybe most in my church are so blase’ about it.

    • Jonathan Brumley says:

      Hi Steve,

      I am glad you discovered the extent of His mercy and grace as a Lutheran. For anyone who suffers with guilt can only be healed by turning to His mercy.

      Your comment “we don’t have to do anything” is a particularly Lutheran expression of the fact that we have done nothing and can never do anything on our own to deserve the grace and mercy He offers. This is the fact that humbles us before His throne, that none of this is ours, we did not “earn” this, but we owe it all to Him.

      We don’t deserve His mercy, but He offers it anyway. And not only forgiveness, but life with it. He forgives us and sets us free. He gives us meaning and purpose. Any good work that we DO, we do it our of love for Him and because it is joy to do it. For He said, “If you love Me, you will keep my commandments” and at the same time “For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” We are slaves to righteousness (Romans 6), and we yet not slaves, but free. We love Him more than all else and we are free to live the love that we seek. And we don’t ever want to turn away, because we know deep down that following Him is the source of our life and hope, and to turn away leads only to despair and death.

      To me, a great part of His victory, the “good news”, is the new life He gives us. It is not only hope and assurance of a life in heaven, but it is the beginning of a life of meaning, a life of walking in His footsteps, a life of sacrificial love the way He showed us. It is the greatest kindness of His mercy, that when He forgave us, He did not leave us slaves to sin, but rather gave us a participation in His own divine life (2 Peter 1), the only life worth living. For it is only in experiencing and sharing His love that we find true joy. He came to us out of love, and He cured us out of love. The healing has begun, we’re only just beginning to get out of bed and take a few steps, but we can be sure He will complete in us what he started – and we will owe it all to Him.

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  5. Anne says:

    Congratulations on your first year anniversary Anthony! The adventure of being Catholic just gets better and better – the more you learn and live it, the more you will love it! As Archbishop Sheen said, “the Church is intolerant in theory because She believes, but is tolerant in practice because She loves.” May your journey of faith continue to be blessed!

  6. Sue says:

    I like your highs and lows- can identify with so many of them, even though I’m a ‘cradle Catholic’. Especially evangelism… where are the Catholics talking about evangelism?

    • Anthony says:

      Thank you Sue! Catholics Come Home has been a great encouragement to me, as has Catholic Memes, Cardinal Dolan, Net Ministries, and especially the Steubenville conferences.

    • midwestlady says:

      There are a few but the idea of evangelization is still shocking to many Catholics, particularly those who have been sacramentalized but not evangelized. There have been three popes talking non-stop about this though and sooner or later, it is going to take hold. That, or the Church is going to be a tiny fragment in the US and Europe in a few decades.

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  8. Darren O. says:

    How did you treat the Catholic faith? Pretty good chance you were blase about it.

  9. Brian O. says:

    Anthony,
    I am a cradle Catholic indebted to converts such as yourself for showing me what has been right in front of me for so many years. So, thank you.

    The average Catholic in the pew is simply ignorant of the truths of the Church and in desperate need of proper faith formation. I have realized that, having been given the gift of a reinvigorated and strengthened faith, I have a moral obligation to reach out to others and share what I have learned. It starts with individuals moved by Grace.

    May the peace and joy of Christ be with you!
    Brian

  10. K C Thomas says:

    Most of the cradle Catholics are satisfied with the Sunday Mass or few bookish prayers. Due to ignorance of the Church teachings, they question the fundamentals of our faith. So what is required is a general evangelization thereby teaching the adults what Jesus teach and the Church teach. The Church can grow only if the members know what they believe and why . May God bless people like Anthony to bring more light and wisdom

  11. De Maria says:

    Low- Cognitive dissonance. I was unprepared for the extent that basic Catholic truths would not be followed in the day-to-day life of the Catholic Church. It’s bizarre when church-going Catholics don’t consider Holy Days of Obligation obligatory,

    That brings up a funny story. I go to Mass with my family twice a month and out of town by myself, twice a month. Although my priest says that I don’t have to go to Mass when I’m on travel for work, I go anyway, because I love the Mass. However, there’s this guy at my home Parish who, every time he sees me says things like, “I see the Old Lady couldn’t corral you to Church last week.”

    Anyway, what I’d like to know is, how do you know those church going Catholics didn’t go to Mass elsewhere? Or, that they didn’t have a good reason not to go to Mass?

    when virtually everyone in every Mass takes the Eucharist despite plain Catechism teaching against receiving when in mortal sin.

    How do you know they are in mortal sin?

    Sincerely,

    De Maria

    • midwestlady says:

      Because Catholic levels of birth control, abortion and divorce are virtually exactly the same as the levels in the general population. And in fact, Catholic behavior in public is virtually identical to the behavior in the general population, if not worse. I’ve been Catholic for years and I’ve taught in Catholic schools, and I’m as shocked by this statement as you are, but only because it’s true.

      • De Maria says:

        midwestlady says:
        May 5, 2013 at 12:04 pm
        Because Catholic levels of birth control, abortion and divorce are virtually exactly the same as the levels in the general population.

        How about levels of Confession to a priest? Or are you privy to every sinner’s confession and to the state of their soul?

        And in fact, Catholic behavior in public is virtually identical to the behavior in the general population, if not worse. I’ve been Catholic for years and I’ve taught in Catholic schools, and I’m as shocked by this statement as you are, but only because it’s true.

        That is your opinion. I don’t believe everything they say in the polls. And I am not God, therefore I don’t judge my neighbor about things I couldn’t possibly know anything about. Again the Scripture says:
        Matthew 7:2
        For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.

        • midwestlady says:

          The current rate of confession in the US is 14%. Yes, you read it correctly. 14% of Catholics go to confession at least once a year. The other 86%, nope. That ought to prove the point about most Catholics not taking their faith particularly seriously right there.

          • De Maria says:

            midwestlady says:
            May 6, 2013 at 12:38 pm
            The current rate of confession in the US is 14%.
            Yes, you read it correctly. 14% of Catholics go to confession at least once a year. The other 86%, nope. That ought to prove the point about most Catholics not taking their faith particularly seriously right there.

            First, its not a fact, its a poll. You need to understand what you read. I’ve been back in the Catholic Church for 25 years now and I don’t remember being asked anything.

            The fact is that 14% OF THOSE POLLED in 2005 went to confession once a year. But here is the complete finding and there is much more to the story. The question asked:

            How often, if ever, do you participate in the Sacrament of Reconciliation or Confession?

            The responses permitted:
            Once a month or more, 2005 2% 2008 2%
            Several times a year 2005 10% 2008 12%
            Once a year 2005 14% 2008 12?%
            Less than once a year 2005 32% 2008 30%
            Never 2005 42% 2008 45%

            There is no room for explanations. No numbers given as to the total population of the sample polled. There is not really any way for the reader to know whether these were actually Catholics polled. What did they do, ask them to pull out their rosaries?

            Now add the totals. In 2005, more than 26% OF THE PEOPLE CLAIMING TO BE CATHOLIC WHO WERE POLLED, went to confession at least once a year.

            Essentially, the number is meaningless. Do yourself a favor and quit judging others. It isn’t your job. Jesus said:

            Matthew 7:2-4
            King James Version (KJV)
            2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. 3 And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?4 Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye?

            And again, Jesus said:
            Luke 18:9 And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others: 10 Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. 11 The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. 12 I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. 13 And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. 14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.

    • Brian O. says:

      De Maria,

      I think you bring up good points in your series of comments here and you are right to remind us of the need to be careful about how we frame our thoughts. However, while the author may have done well to add a few qualifications to his post, I think much of what he said rings true in my own experience and I don’t see it as a stretch to believe that many people receiving communion do so in an unworthy manner.

      • De Maria says:

        Brian O. says:
        May 5, 2013 at 3:02 pm
        De Maria,

        I think you bring up good points in your series of comments here and you are right to remind us of the need to be careful about how we frame our thoughts.

        Thanks.

        However, while the author may have done well to add a few qualifications to his post,

        Yes, I agree.

        I think much of what he said rings true in my own experience and I don’t see it as a stretch to believe that many people receiving communion do so in an unworthy manner.

        Perhaps some do. But that is neither his, your nor my business. And the Church certainly doesn’t teach us to go around proclaiming the sinfulness of our neighbors. Am I right or wrong?

        Romans 14:4
        Who art thou that judgest another man’s servant? to his own master he standeth or falleth. Yea, he shall be holden up: for God is able to make him stand.

        And that is not what he said. Here is the quote:
        when virtually everyone in every Mass takes the Eucharist despite plain Catechism teaching against receiving when in mortal sin.

        Do you think that virtually every Catholic receives the Eucharist in mortal sin?

        I remind all the Catholics on this site:

        1861 Mortal sin is a radical possibility of human freedom, as is love itself. It results in the loss of charity and the privation of sanctifying grace, that is, of the state of grace. If it is not redeemed by repentance and God’s forgiveness, it causes exclusion from Christ’s kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices for ever, with no turning back. However, although we can judge that an act is in itself a grave offense, we must entrust judgment of persons to the justice and mercy of God.

        Sincerely,

        De Maria

        • joeclark77 says:

          De Maria, the author isn’t “passing judgment” on any individual. He’s talking about his own struggle that resulted from the obvious impiety of other Catholics. This is a common observation of many converts, like me. The proper word for this is “scandal” (words or actions that lead other souls to sin) and we’re allowed to talk about it. You shouldn’t presume to judge individuals but you can certainly make educated guesses about averages and frequencies.

          • De Maria says:

            joeclark77 says:
            May 6, 2013 at 8:56 am
            De Maria, the author isn’t “passing judgment” on any individual.

            Sounds to me as though he’s passing judgment on virtually every Catholic.

            He’s talking about his own struggle that resulted from the obvious impiety of other Catholics. This is a common observation of many converts, like me. The proper word for this is “scandal” (words or actions that lead other souls to sin) and we’re allowed to talk about it. You shouldn’t presume to judge individuals but you can certainly make educated guesses about averages and frequencies.

            So, you agree with the author that virtually every Catholic that takes communion is in mortal sin?

  12. De Maria says:

    Low- Evangelism. It took me months before I could find a Catholic who sheepishly admitted we should want other people to be Catholic. The leaders have been talking about the New Evangelization for half a century,

    In my humble opinion, looking down upon your fellow Catholics is not a good way to start out. I’m a revert, but I was born into the Catholic Church. And I remember that we were taught to evangelize by our works. Does that sound familiar? Its from Scripture:

    Matthew 5:16
    Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.

    and not to engage in unfruitful arguments about the faith:

    2 Timothy 2:23
    King James Version (KJV)
    23 But foolish and unlearned questions avoid, knowing that they do gender strifes.

    yet many look at their feet and quote something St. Francis never said.

    How do you know? The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. It would be more accurate to say that St. Francis may not actually have said this, but in my opinion, it is in perfect alignment with his spirit and with the spirit of the Gospel.

    Sincerely,

    De Maria

    • midwestlady says:

      A lot of people claim to be reverts who never really left, I know that for a fact. Usually they just forget to come to church for a while and think that returning to Sunday habits qualifies as some kind of dramatic conversion, which it does not.

      • De Maria says:

        midwestlady says:
        May 5, 2013 at 12:06 pm
        A lot of people claim to be reverts who never really left, I know that for a fact.

        That’s not the case with me. I know that for a fact.

        Usually they just forget to come to church for a while

        At least fourteen years and in the interim I denied the existence of God.

        and think that returning to Sunday habits qualifies as some kind of dramatic conversion, which it does not.

        My faith is between me and God. Apparently, you think it is your right to judge other people’s souls. In which case, you need to study your Catholic faith. Catholicism teaches that God is our Judge and the Scripture, which the Catholic Church wrote by the way, says:
        1 Corinthians 4:3-5
        King James Version (KJV)
        3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man’s judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self. 4 For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord. 5 Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts: and then shall every man have praise of God.

        Therefore, I paraphrase the Word of God. It is a very small thing to me if you think my conversion back to the Catholic faith was dramatic or not. He that judges me is the Lord.

        Sincerely,

        De Maria

        • midwestlady says:

          It is a fact that many “reversions” aren’t really reversions. In your particular case, I don’t know what happened because I don’t know you, but then I didn’t say I knew what happened to you, did I?

          • De Maria says:


            midwestlady says:
            May 6, 2013 at 12:27 pm
            It is a fact that many “reversions” aren’t really reversions.

            Is there a scientific study to that effect? Or are you presenting your mere opinions as facts?

            In your particular case, I don’t know what happened because I don’t know you, but then I didn’t say I knew what happened to you, did I?

            No, but I’m the only one that mentioned being a revert and you responded to the message wherein I revealed that I was a revert by belittling those who claim to be reverts.

    • midwestlady says:

      St. Francis never said that. It’s a pious fiction. You can search all the things he ever wrote and you will not find it. It’s something that appeared later in one of the works about him, a work of popular hagiography, designed to make people feel good.

      • De Maria says:

        midwestlady says:
        May 6, 2013 at 12:34 pm
        St. Francis never said that…..

        Did you walk with St. Francis? Did you hear everything he ever said? Have you read everything that he wrote? Or are you simply omniscient?

  13. midwestlady says:

    You’re not the only one who’s observed this stuff. I’m a convert and I’ve seen the same things. Read a book called “Forming Intentional Disciples” by Sherry Weddell for a better explanation than any you’re going to get elsewhere. Website is here:
    http://www.siena.org/

  14. K C Thomas says:

    You are right, De Maria, when you say that Catholics should not look down upon other Catholics. It may be just enquiring about you , when somebody told you about your absence in the church the previous Sunday. It can be disposed of by a smile or a humble reply ” I was out”. We should not take such comments or enquiry seriously, as there may not be any mal fide intention. Also it is good to be humble and friendly as it will save hurt to anyone. When I wrote about evangelization, I meant it because there are many Catholics who are ignorant of many Catholic teachings, though they are sincere and attend church. It is not their fault but the fault of those who are entrusted with the work of teaching the “sheep”

    • midwestlady says:

      It’s not that they’re ignorant of church teachings. It’s that they don’t get the point of being Catholic in the first place, because they haven’t been taught that usually through no fault of their own.

      • midwestlady says:

        It’s actually a great tragedy, and not so much a matter of laying the blame on the ordinary people in the pews, who are struggling along, thinking they have to do all this stuff, and not knowing why. This is why a great many of them drop out. They don’t know why they are supposed to do these things that they’re told they must do.

        • midwestlady says:

          And when they ask, they are usually shut down and just told to obey. This is not a reason to do these things. And increasingly people are catching onto this, thus our statistics.

          10% of the US is now ex-Catholic. We have got to evangelize within the Church, so that people in the Church start to understand what *Christianity is about.*